Long Distance Inline Skating Training Commerce City CO

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Long Distance Inline Skating Training. You will find helpful, informative articles about Long Distance Inline Skating Training, including "How to Train for Sprints and Long Distances", "To Skate Fast, Train Fast", and "Tips for Long Distance Skates". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Commerce City, CO that will answer all of your questions about Long Distance Inline Skating Training.

Curves
(303) 288-5598
6025 E Parkway Dr
Commerce City, CO
 
X-treme Challenge Gladiator Arena
(303) 255-2221
9499 Washington St Unit B
Denver, CO
Industry
Personal Trainer

Data Provided By:
Curves
(303) 450-0220
10380 Washington St
Denver, CO
 
Colorado Rehabilitation & Occupational Medicine
(303) 280-3893
9351 Grant St
Denver, CO
Industry
Osteopath (DO), Personal Trainer, Physical Therapist

Data Provided By:
Fitness Gallery
(303) 308-1100
5220 Broadway
Denver, CO
Industry
Personal Trainer

Data Provided By:
Reunion Snap Fitness
(303) 289-7333
18240 E. 104th Ave.
Commerce City, CO
Programs & Services
Circuit Training, Elliptical Trainers, Free Weights, Personal Training, Pilates, Stair Climber, Stationary Bikes, Towel Service, Treadmill, Weight Machines

Data Provided By:
Lady Fitness Center
(303) 252-0005
550 Thornton Pkwy
Thornton, CO
 
Bally Total Fitness
(303) 452-4134
10001 Grant St # 101
Denver, CO
 
Thornton II Bally Total Fitness
10001 Grant St
Denver, CO
Programs & Services
Bilingual staff, Cardio Equipment, Child Center, Group Exercise Studio, Parking, Personal Training, Pilates, Pool, Reaction Cycling, Sauna, Silver Sneakers, Steam Room, Tanning, Whirl Pool, Yoga

Data Provided By:
Anytime Fitness Northglenn, CO
(303) 450-6200
420 E 120th Ave, Suite #B11
Denver, CO
Programs & Services
24-hr Operations, Cardio Equipment, Circuit Training, Elliptical Trainers, Free Weights, Parking, Personal Training, Spinning, Stair Climber, Stationary Bikes, Treadmill, Weight Machines

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

How to Train for Sprints and Long Distances

June 23, 2010

Training for Sprints and Long Distances?

QHi, Bill: I am the assistant coach of the up-and-coming Kenya inline speed skating team. (The head coach is Joseph Mwangi.) We love your work! ... Could you please recommend a program for sprints and long-distance training. - Gaggan Mehta

Ask the Coach!

Ask Bill a question!

Go to the Ask Bill Begg! Archive .

Hi, Gaggan Mehta: I would be happy to help and look forward to the day that Kenya produces great endurance skaters on a par with your great Olympic runners.

Without knowing more about your team, it's difficult to offer specific training regimens. But I can give you some general recommendations.

The first is to include 500-meter interval training in your program. All successful inline racers, whether sprinters or endurance specialists, must have a good 500-meter sprint. Without it, few skaters taste success on the road or track. A great way to develop a fast 500 meters is by doing 500-meter interval training.

I recommend starting this training early in the season with sessions of ten 500-meter sprints, separated by three minutes of rest. This works best when you have a group of skaters and designate a leader to set the pace for at least the first 300 meters.

Later in the season, switch to eight 500-meter sprints with five minutes rest. Cutting the number of reps and increasing the rest makes it easier for skaters to focus on quality and form, which is important as you get closer to major competitions.

As I'm sure you know, technique is essential for developing speed. Nowadays, skaters can't succeed without efficient technique. In fact, I would estimate that 50 to 60 percent of what makes a great skater is technique. So be sure you're program has a strong focus on technique. ( Bil...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Inline Planet

Tips for Long Distance Skates

By Eddy Matzger

Skaters in the Cold

Eddy Matzger on a road skate in Thailand in 2009.
Photo: Skate Central

 

With cooler, "northern-California weather" prevailing across the country, now's the season for long touring skates. Whether you're a leaf-peeper or a serious road skater (think A to A!), there are always a few things to consider before launching on that epic fall classic skate.

Bolts and stickers

Most bolts rattle tight (a personal opinion), but the ones that rattle loose can get you. After literally watching my front wheel go bounding into the Pacific Ocean during a skate race in the early 90's, I now make a habit of checking my equipment with extra care before a big race.

I recently completed the 100K in Prospect Park without mishap only to nearly buy the farm on the Brooklyn Bridge's bumpy boardwalk later that night on the way to the awards ceremony. On the downhill approach into Manhattan, threading my way through a sea of tourists, one bolt r...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Inline Planet

To Skate Fast, Train Fast

By Barry Publow
 

Skaters doing interval training

Scott Pauley (yellow skinsuit) keeps track of the time during a session of interval training. Behind him is Shannon Hegarty and Jacky Shu.

Photo: Peter Doucet, Speed Skate World

One of the most profound misconceptions about training is that skating lots of miles improves your speed. I hate to disappoint all you mega-mileage freaks, but skating a ton of miles won't make you faster.

That's not to say that it's not good for you. Piling on the miles will burn calories, improve your cardiovascular performance, and elevate your relative muscular endurance. But these are NOT the things that allow you to go fast over a distance of 26 miles!

The only way to race fast is to train fast, and this is where interval and "fartlek" training come into play.

Most skaters know what interval training is. But few understand the science behind it. As a result, they don't know how to adapt it to their racing or training schedule. They do the same intervals whether they are preparing for a 10K or a marathon. And that's simply wrong.

Here are some rules to keep in mind:

No. 1

When preparing for a race, do a long skate once a week. This skate should be about 80-110 percent of your race distance. (So, therefore, if you are preparing for a marathon, you should do one skate a week of 20-28 miles.)

No. 2

Twice a week, do hard interval workouts. (These sessions will be the primary mechanism to make you fast!)

No. 3

At least once a wee...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Inline Planet